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HCG for men with Low-T

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin 

(HCG)

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What is Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG)?


Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) is an analog of luteinizing hormone (LH). (An analog means it is identical at the molecular level.) Administering HCG to men can stimulate the testicles to produce testosterone.

In men, the anterior pituitary gland produces LH in response to gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. LH acts on the Leydig cells of the testicles, stimulating the testicles to produce intratesticular testosterone and promote spermatogenesis (sperm production).

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of HCG in select cases of hypogonadism as a result of a pituitary deficiency (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) in males. HCG may also be prescribed for off-label use.




How does HCG support testosterone replacement therapy?


The use and administration of exogenous (external) testosterone in men can affect male fertility by impairing spermatogenesis (sperm production) and reducing testicular size.

Exogenous testosterone reduces the natural secretion of LH from the anterior pituitary glands, which reduces the body’s natural signal to the testicles to trigger testosterone and sperm production. Using HCG can help maintain that signal to the testicles, promoting natural testosterone and sperm production.

The use of HCG in combination with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) provides a pathway to maintain intratesticular testosterone production necessary to maintain testicular function, volume, and spermatogenesis.

In clinical studies, eugonadal men (men with healthy gonadal glands and a normal testosterone value) who underwent TRT had a decline in their levels of intratesticular testosterone levels by 94 percent. However, men who received 250 IU SC every other day during TRT experienced intratesticular testosterone levels that dropped by only 7 percent. Other studies show that men who underwent TRT and received 500 IU of HCG every other day saw a 26 percent increase in intratesticular testosterone.




How is HCG used during testosterone replacement?


Men on testosterone therapy can use HCG to reduce the side effects of testosterone therapy. Common side effects of testosterone therapy include testicular atrophy and lowered sperm production. HCG may be considered by men who are considering testosterone therapy and want to preserve their fertility and/or the size of their testicles.

In men who present with infertility, likely as a result of testosterone therapy, recent studies show that HCG can stimulate the recovery of spermatogenesis (sperm production).





HCG FAQs

What is Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG)?


Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) is an analog of luteinizing hormone (LH). (An analog means it is identical at the molecular level.) Administering HCG to men can stimulate the testicles to produce testosterone.

In men, the anterior pituitary gland produces LH in response to gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. LH acts on the Leydig cells of the testicles, stimulating the testicles to produce intratesticular testosterone and promote spermatogenesis (sperm production).

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of HCG in select cases of hypogonadism as a result of a pituitary deficiency (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) in males. HCG may also be prescribed for off-label use.




How does HCG support testosterone replacement therapy?


The use and administration of exogenous (external) testosterone in men can affect male fertility by impairing spermatogenesis (sperm production) and reducing testicular size.

Exogenous testosterone reduces the natural secretion of LH from the anterior pituitary glands, which reduces the body’s natural signal to the testicles to trigger testosterone and sperm production. Using HCG can help maintain that signal to the testicles, promoting natural testosterone and sperm production.

The use of HCG in combination with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) provides a pathway to maintain intratesticular testosterone production necessary to maintain testicular function, volume, and spermatogenesis.

In clinical studies, eugonadal men (men with healthy gonadal glands and a normal testosterone value) who underwent TRT had a decline in their levels of intratesticular testosterone levels by 94 percent. However, men who received 250 IU SC every other day during TRT experienced intratesticular testosterone levels that dropped by only 7 percent. Other studies show that men who underwent TRT and received 500 IU of HCG every other day saw a 26 percent increase in intratesticular testosterone.




How is HCG used during testosterone replacement?


Men on testosterone therapy can use HCG to reduce the side effects of testosterone therapy. Common side effects of testosterone therapy include testicular atrophy and lowered sperm production. HCG may be considered by men who are considering testosterone therapy and want to preserve their fertility and/or the size of their testicles.

In men who present with infertility, likely as a result of testosterone therapy, recent studies show that HCG can stimulate the recovery of spermatogenesis (sperm production).





HCG Safety Information

Who should take HCG?


HCG is not right for everyone. Only your healthcare provider can decide if HCG is right for you.

Do not take HCG is you have or have had any of the following conditions:

  • Precocious puberty (an early puberty, typically defined as starting before age 9 in boys)
  • Prostatic carcinoma or other androgendependent neoplasm
  • Prior allergic reaction to HCG

Women and children under the age of 18 should not take HCG. Only those who have specifically been prescribed HCG should take it. Never share HCG with others, even if their symptoms are similar, as it may cause serious harm.




Does HCG cause any drug reactions?


While no studies of HCG use in humans have been conducted, some herbal or alternative therapies may have effects on hypothalamic-pituitary functions or hormone concentrations, so they may interfere with HCG treatment.

The following suggests a few therapies that may interfere with HCG fertility treatment, though this list is not exhaustive:

  • Chaste berry (also known as chaste tree fruit or vitex agnuscasus)
  • Black cohosh (aka cimicifuga racemose)
  • Blue cohosh (aka caulophyllum thalictroides)

Always share a list of all medicines, herbs, supplements, and nonprescription drugs you use with your physician.




What are the common side effects of HCG?


HCG treatment can have a variety of side effects. Common side effects include:

  • Headache
  • Irritability or restlessness
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Edema
  • Precocious puberty
  • Gynecomastia
  • Pain at the injection site




What are the uncommon side effects of HCG?


Uncommon side effects of HCG may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Metabolism and nutrition disorders. Water and sodium retention is occasionally seen after administration of high dosages; this is regarded as a result of excessive androgen production.
  • Reproductive system and breast disorders. HCG treatment may sporadically cause gynecomastia (male breast enlargement).




Has HCG been linked to hepatic impairment?


The pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of HCG have not been established in patients with hepatic impairment.




Who should I contact if I have a reaction to HCG?


If you experience serious side effects such as fainting, heart attack, or significant allergic reaction, seek immediate medical help. Contact your physician if you have questions about HCG.




What does my healthcare provider need to know before I take HCG?


Your physician or healthcare provider must know all medications and non-prescription drugs or medicines you are currently taking. Before taking HCG, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical problems.